An endodontist is a dental specialist registered with the Dental Board of Australia, who has finished his/her training as a general dentist, and then has undergone a minimum of three years full-time additional training in diagnosing and treating diseases of the “dental pulp”, commonly known as “the nerve” of the tooth.

Endodontists perform routine as well as difficult and very complex endodontic procedures, including initial root canal treatment and retreatment of previous root canals that have recurring disease. Endodontists are also trained in the diagnosis of tooth related pain.

You may have been referred to our office because your general dentist feels you may require either non-surgical endodontic treatment or non-surgical endodontic re-treatment, or another endodontic procedure too complex for general practice. These procedures are typically carried out in two visits, some 2-3 weeks apart, but depending on the circumstances, shorter or longer time frames may be suggested. The appointment duration of one hour to ninety minutes allows us to comprehensively diagnose your problem, and to provide you with a safe and comfortable treatment experience.

The dental pulp can become inflamed or infected due to tooth decay, deep fillings, cracks, or trauma. This can give rise to a dental abscess, sometimes accompanied by severe pain and swelling. Endodontic treatment aims at eliminating the infection, thereby preserving the tooth in your mouth.

Your endodontist removes the infected dental pulp, and carefully inspects the root canal space under the microscope. He then thoroughly cleans and shapes the root canal system, i.e. the space from which the infected pulp has been removed. Often a medicated dressing is placed at the end of this appointment, which will help to fully disinfect the complex root canal system.

In the second appointment the dressing is removed, and the root canals are carefully disinfected again. Following this they are sealed off with a biocompatible material, to help prevent reinfection.

The endodontist will send a detailed treatment report including radiographs back to your general dentist, who will now be able to restore your tooth. In many cases a crown (cap) will be advised, to protect your tooth, and to restore normal form and function.

  • Click here for more information about endodontic treatment.
  • You can find a short video explaining endodontic treatment here.
  • Click here for a short video on root canal safety.

Occasionally a tooth may not heal as expected after previous root canal treatment. This can have a variety of reasons, including:

  • A new cavity may have developed, allowing bacteria to access the root canal filling.
  • A more complex anatomy than anticipated, with not all canals found and cleaned at the initial treatment.
  • A crack, leading to reinfection of the root canal system.

Your endodontist will examine the tooth and assess, if redoing your root canal filling might give your tooth a new lease on life, avoiding tooth extraction. Your endodontist removes the previous root canal filling, and carefully inspects the root canal space under the microscope particularly looking for additional canals, which may not have been found previously. Retreatment is a more complex and technically demanding procedure than original root canal treatment. Your endodontist then thoroughly cleans and shapes the root canal system, and a medicated dressing is placed at the end of this appointment, which will help to fully disinfect the complex root canal system.

In the second appointment the dressing is removed, and the root canals are carefully disinfected again. Following this they are sealed off with a biocompatible material, to help prevent reinfection.

The endodontist will send a detailed treatment report including radiographs back to your general dentist, who will now be able to restore your tooth. In many cases a crown (cap) will be advised, to protect your tooth, and to restore normal form and function.

  • Click here for more information about endodontic retreatment.
  • You can find a short video explaining endodontic retreatment here.

Through grinding, biting on hard objects such as a cherry pit, but also through everyday chewing, a tooth can sustain a crack. This means that the tooth may appear intact, but it may be painful to chew or to have cold or hot foods. Depending on the type and severity of a crack, endodontic treatment may help eliminate pain, avoid infection and save the tooth for years to come. You can find a short video explaining the “cracked tooth syndrome” here.

Endodontic microsurgery, also called root end resection or “apicoectomy”, may be suggested on rare occasions, where previous endodontic treatment of a tooth has not led to healing, and where endodontic retreatment is unlikely to bring about the desired success.

Please click here for more information about endodontic microsurgery.

Yes, we do. Depending on the severity and type of injury sustained , endodontic treatment may be required to save a tooth that has been knocked, broken or – even worse – knocked out.

Generally we prefer to have an assessment appointment first. This will enable us to evaluate the problem you present with, and to set aside an adequate amount of time for your treatment. In coordination with your referring dentist we may make appointments to go straight to treatment however, especially if you are in pain.

Please be sure to bring the following to your initial appointment:
  • details about your past medical history, as well as of medications taken, both prescribed and over the counter.
  • name and contact details of both your referring dentist and of your GP.
  • your referral, if you were given one by your dentist, and relevant x-rays and scans if any.
  • Please advise our receptionist, if you require premedication prior to dental treatment, such as antibiotics for an artificial heart valve, joint replacements in the past 2 years, stent placements in the past 6 months or other medical conditions.

If you are in pain, we will do our best to see you at short notice, often on the day you call.

As a general rule, if there is discomfort before your appointment, there will likely be some discomfort after your appointment for a few days. Dr Steinig will discuss this with you during your visit with us, and recommend an appropriate regime to manage discomfort with pain killers. See patient instructions.

Nitrous Oxide, also known as "Laughing Gas", offers the benefit of relaxation with no loss of consciousness. A mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen is inhaled during your procedure. Nitrous oxide is administered together with a local anaesthetic. Nitrous Oxide sedation is reversible within seconds upon conclusion of your procedure, and may be administered upon request. Please advise the endodontist if you are or could possibly be pregnant, when you meet with him for you appointment.

Upon request we can arrange for treatment under intravenous sedation in our rooms. A registered specialist dental anesthetist will administer a medication which induces a sleep-like state, for the duration of the procedure (usually 60-90 minutes). Your reflexes are maintained and your breathing is unaffected, and upon awakening you often will have no recollection of the procedure. Our friendly staff can advise you of costs and special instructions for this type of anesthesia. Please note that a prior consultation is mandatory for this type of treatment.

For your convenience we accept Cash, Visa, MasterCard, AMEX and Eftpos. Payment is due at the time of treatment . Please advise in advance, if other accommodations may have to be made. If you are an eligible DVA Gold Card Holder, please bring your Gold Card to your appointment.

Costs vary depending on the individual circumstances of the case. Please telephone our reception for further information. Your initial assessment visit will usually cost $250, including radiographs. If additional imaging is required (such as a Cone Beam CT) to assess your dental problem, the endodontist will advise you accordingly.

The cost of a standard root canal procedure ranges from $1900 to $2600, depending on tooth type and the type of treatment required.